EPS Mid-Career Award 2006. Understanding anterograde amnesia: disconnections and hidden lesions.

@article{Aggleton2008EPSMA,
  title={EPS Mid-Career Award 2006. Understanding anterograde amnesia: disconnections and hidden lesions.},
  author={John P. Aggleton},
  journal={Quarterly journal of experimental psychology},
  year={2008},
  volume={61 10},
  pages={1441-71}
}
Three emerging strands of evidence are helping to resolve the causes of the anterograde amnesia associated with damage to the diencephalon. First, new anatomical studies have refined our understanding of the links between diencephalic and temporal brain regions associated with amnesia. These studies direct attention to the limited numbers of routes linking the two regions. Second, neuropsychological studies of patients with colloid cysts confirm the importance of at least one of these routes… CONTINUE READING

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