EPIZOOTIOLOGY AND EFFECT OF AVIAN POX ON HAWAIIAN FOREST BIRDS

@inproceedings{vanRiper2002EPIZOOTIOLOGYAE,
  title={EPIZOOTIOLOGY AND EFFECT OF AVIAN POX ON HAWAIIAN FOREST BIRDS},
  author={Charles van Riper and S van Riper and Wallace R. Hansen},
  year={2002}
}
Abstract We determined prevalence and altitudinal distribution of forest birds infected with avian pox at 16 locations on Hawaii, from sea level to tree line in mesic and xeric habitats, during 1977–1980. Isolates from lesions were cultured in the laboratory for positive identification of Poxvirus avium. Infected birds from the wild were brought into the laboratory to assess differences in the course of infection in native versus introduced species. We also documented distributions and activity… 

The epidemiology of avian pox and interaction with avian malaria in Hawaiian forest birds

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Darwin's finch species were found to be differentially affected by poxvirus, with a higher prevalence in ground finches than in tree finches, and there was a significant effect of habitat, even within species, with high prevalence in the lowlands than highlands.

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