EPIDERMAL “TURNOVER TIME”—A RE‐EXAMINATION

@article{Halprin1972EPIDERMALT,
  title={EPIDERMAL “TURNOVER TIME”—A RE‐EXAMINATION},
  author={Kenneth M. Halprin},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1972},
  volume={86}
}
  • K. Halprin
  • Published 1 January 1972
  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Dermatology
SUMMARY.— The literature on the turnover or renewal time of normal and psoriatic epidermis is critically reviewed. It is concluded that the time taken by a cell to travel to the surface, once it has been formed, is probably 40‐56 days in normal skin, and 6‐8 days in psoriatic skin. 

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References

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TLDR
The stratified squamous epithelium of human skin is constantly renewed by multiplication of the cells of the stratum germinativum, and it is usually assumed that the cellular contents are lost to the body.
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This study attempts to characterize the hyperplasia of the epidermis in psoriasis, and to outline the kinetics of some of the changes in the tissues and cell populations involved.
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TLDR
A turnover time of approximately 30 days of pig epidermis was recently found by Weinstein (3) in an autoradiographic study utilizing both tritiated thymidine and glycine-C14 as nuclear and protein labels respectively.
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A significant number of thymidine-labeled cells (deoxyribonucleic acid-synthesizing cells) were found above the basal cell layer in all conditions examined.
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TLDR
The turnover time of human epidermis is determined by measuring isotopically labeled stratum corneum protein (keratin) collected after the intravenous injection of glycine-C14 to be 26-28 days.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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