ENNIUS' ‘CUNCTATOR’ AND THE HISTORY OF A GERUND IN THE ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHICAL TRADITION1

@article{Elliott2009ENNIUSA,
  title={ENNIUS' ‘CUNCTATOR’ AND THE HISTORY OF A GERUND IN THE ROMAN HISTORIOGRAPHICAL TRADITION1},
  author={Jackie Elliott},
  journal={The Classical Quarterly},
  year={2009},
  volume={59},
  pages={532 - 542}
}
  • J. Elliott
  • Published 23 November 2009
  • History
  • The Classical Quarterly
This paper explores the use, primarily in Book 22 of the Ab Urbe Condita, of one of Ennius’ best known formulations: unus homo nobis cunctando restituit rem (Ann. 363).2 The line famously describes the tactics of Fabius Maximus ‘Cunctator’ against Hannibal in 217/216 B.C.E. Livy’s reconfigured uses of it in Book 22 are so frequent that it almost appears to take on a life of its own in his hands. It functions as a means of articulating a central fault line in Roman military strategy and of… 

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  • J. Elliott
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  • 2022
This analysis explores aspects of the extant fragmentary record of early Roman poetry from its earliest accessible moments through roughly the first hundred and twenty years of its traceable

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References

Obituaries in Tacitus