EMG and tibial shock upon the first attempt at barefoot running.

@article{Olin2013EMGAT,
  title={EMG and tibial shock upon the first attempt at barefoot running.},
  author={Evan D Olin and Gregory M. Gutierrez},
  journal={Human movement science},
  year={2013},
  volume={32 2},
  pages={
          343-52
        }
}
As a potential means to decrease their risk of injury, many runners are transitioning into barefoot running. Habitually shod runners tend to heel-strike (SHS), landing on their heel first, while barefoot runners tend to mid-foot or toe-strike (BTS), landing flat-footed or on the ball of their foot before bringing down the rest of the foot including the heel. This study compared muscle activity, tibial shock, and knee flexion angle in subjects between shod and barefoot conditions. Eighteen… Expand
Initiating running barefoot: Effects on muscle activation and impact accelerations in habitually rearfoot shod runners
TLDR
32% of runners showed a rearfoot strike pattern at the first attempts at running barefoot, which corresponds to a running style (BRS) that led to increased muscle activation and impact accelerations and thereby to a potentially higher risk of injury compared to running shod. Expand
Acute response to barefoot running in habitually shod males.
TLDR
The results highlight that recruitment patterns and kinematics can change in as little as 30-s of BF running in individuals with no previous BF running experience. Expand
Are muscle activation patterns altered during shod and barefoot running with a forefoot footfall pattern?
TLDR
It is suggested that wearing shoes or not is less important for muscle activation than the way runners strike the foot on the ground, and guidance for changing external forces applied on lower limbs should be pointed to the question of rearfoot or forefoot footfall patterns. Expand
Muscle activation of plantar flexors in response to different strike patterns during barefoot and shod running in medial tibial stress syndrome
TLDR
It is suggested that subjects with MTSS have higher activity of the plantar flexors during running, especially with the FFS pattern, which suggests greater stress on soft tissues of the tibial portion and a tendency to develop M TSS. Expand
Modelling of Muscle Force Distributions During Barefoot and Shod Running
TLDR
The kinematic analysis showed that the shod condition was associated with significantly more hip flexion, whilst barefoot running was linked with significant more flexion at the knee and plantarflexion atThe ankle. Expand
The Role of the Ankle Plantar Flexors During Running with Different Strike Patterns
TLDR
This study found no significant differences in the activation time or magnitude of the tibialis anterior or medial gastrocnemius muscles during RFS and nRFS running. Expand
Running Characteristics of Plantar Flexor Forces Based on Different Foot Strike Patterns in Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome
TLDR
The results of musculoskeletal modeling suggest that subjects with MTSS have greater muscle forces of the plantar flexor during running, especially barefoot running with the FFS pattern, which suggests increased forces in some plantars generated great traction force by repetitively landing on connective tissues in the deep crural fascia. Expand
An Acute Bout of Barefoot Running Alters Lower-limb Muscle Activation for Minimalist Shoe Users.
TLDR
Results indicate that, for minimalist shoe users, an acute bout of barefoot running results in significantly different lower-limb muscle activity, which presents a possible mechanism for injury. Expand
Landing pattern and vertical loading rates during first attempt of barefoot running in habitual shod runners.
TLDR
Habitual shod runners presented lower loading rates during barefoot running but their landing pattern transitions were not uniform, and Novice barefoot runners with a mixed landing pattern may sustain higher loading rates, compared with those who completely avoided heelstrike pattern. Expand
A comparative biomechanical analysis of habitually unshod and shod runners based on a foot morphological difference.
TLDR
It can be concluded that for habitually unshod runners the separate hallux takes part of the foot loading and reduces loading to the forefoot under shod conditions, and the remaining toes of rearfoot strike (RFS) runners function similarly under unshown conditions. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Biomechanical and physiological comparison of barefoot and two shod conditions in experienced barefoot runners.
TLDR
The data of this study support the assumption that changes in the foot-ground interface led to changes in running pattern in a group of experienced barefoot runners and the Fivefingers model seems to be effective in imitating the barefoot conditions while providing a small amount of protection. Expand
Mechanical comparison of barefoot and shod running.
TLDR
Barefoot running leads to a reduction of impact peak in order to reduce the high mechanical stress occurring during repetitive steps, and this neural-mechanical adaptation could also enhance the storage and restitution of elastic energy at ankle extensors level. Expand
Evaluation of lower extremity overuse injury potential in runners.
TLDR
The results suggest that runners who have developed stride patterns that incorporate relatively low levels of impact forces, and a moderately rapid rate of pronation are at a reduced risk of incurring overuse running injuries. Expand
Foot strike patterns and collision forces in habitually barefoot versus shod runners
TLDR
Kinematic and kinetic analyses show that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who fore-foot strike generate smaller collision forces than shod rear-foot strikers, and this difference results primarily from a more plantarflexed foot at landing and more ankle compliance during impact, decreasing the effective mass of the body that collides with the ground. Expand
Changes in EMG signals for the muscle tibialis anterior while running barefoot or with shoes resolved by non-linearly scaled wavelets.
TLDR
The frequency shift between pre- and post heel-strike muscle activity were discussed with respect to activation of different motor units and the intensity of the pre-heel- strike muscle activity increased compared to the post- heel-strike one when wearing shoes. Expand
FOOT STRIKE PATTERNS OF RUNNERS AT THE 15‐KM POINT DURING AN ELITE‐LEVEL HALF MARATHON
TLDR
The findings of this study indicate that foot strike patterns are related to running speed, and a shorter contact time and a higher frequency of inversion at the foot contact might contribute to higher running economy. Expand
Use of Ground Reaction Force Parameters in Predicting Peak Tibial Accelerations in Running.
TLDR
The good prediction of tibial accelerations by the maximum vertical force rate toward the initial force peak suggests that the use of a force platform is sufficient for the estimation of shock-absorbing properties of sport shoes. Expand
Protective Sensation of the Plantar Aspect of the Foot
TLDR
It is found that plantar skin possesses a higher pain threshold to abrading stimuli than hairy skin, and information combined with previous reports suggests that risk of injury when normally shod individuals perform barefoot locomotion should be low. Expand
Effects of shoe cushioning upon ground reaction forces in running.
TLDR
It was found that the time to the vertical force impact peak (VFIP) was significantly longer and the minimum after the VFIP was significantly delayed in the soft shoe, while the peak VF propulsive force occurred statistically at the same time in both shoes. Expand
Relation between running injury and static lower limb alignment in recreational runners
TLDR
In recreational runners, there is no evidence that static biomechanical alignment measurements of the lower limbs are related to lower limb injury except patellofemoral pain syndrome, however, the effect of static lower limb alignment may be injury specific. Expand
...
1
2
3
...