EFFECTS OF VISUAL DEPRIVATION ON MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLS IN THE CATS LATERAL GENICULATE BODY.

@article{Wiesel1963EFFECTSOV,
  title={EFFECTS OF VISUAL DEPRIVATION ON MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLS IN THE CATS LATERAL GENICULATE BODY.},
  author={Torsten N. Wiesel and David H. Hubel},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={1963},
  volume={26},
  pages={
          978-93
        }
}
  • T. WieselD. Hubel
  • Published 1 November 1963
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Journal of neurophysiology
THEIMPORTANCEOFNORMALSENSORYSTIMULATION inthedevelopment and maintenance of the nervous system is now generally recognized. In the visual system this problem has usually been approached by examining the effects of sensory deprivation on structure and behavior (see reviews by Hebb (12) and Riesen (28)). An obvious way of extending this work would be to examine electrophysiologically the functional effects of visual deprivation, but such experiments require some knowledge of normal function… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Effects of visual deprivation on the development of the monkey's lateral geniculate nucleus.

Although the post‐natal maturation of visual acuity in normal monkeys seems to be mainly limited by peripheral factors, deprivation does not seem to interfere substantially with physiological development of the retina or the geniculate nucleus in monkeys monocularly deprived from birth.

Monocular deprivation and the signal transmission by X- and Y-neurons of the cat lateral geniculate nucleus

The pattern deprivation effects found morphologically and physiologically in the visual cortex are, therefore, not induced by a diminished average activity of the input neurons from the deprived eye.

Effects of monocular deprivation on the structure-function relationship of individual neurons in the cat's lateral geniculate nucleus

Soma size measurements indicate that the abnormally small somata found in deprived geniculate laminae result from a selective effect on Y-cells, and this analysis is extended in cats reared with monocular eyelid suture to 24geniculate neurons innervated by the sutured eye in lamina A or A1.

Effects of monocular deprivation in kittens

  • David H. HubelTorsten N. Wiesel
  • Biology
    Naunyn-Schmiedebergs Archiv für experimentelle Pathologie und Pharmakologie
  • 2004
The anatomic and physiological effects of depriving kittens of vision in one eye for various lengths of time and at various ages 7,s are summarized.

Effects of early monocular deprivation on development of cortico-geniculate projections in the cat

It is suggested that normal maturation of cortico-geniculate cells, particularly fast and intermediate ones, is retarded or arrested by monocular visual deprivation.

Effect of sensory disuse on geniculate afferents to cat visual cortex

The morphology of geniculocortical arbors in kittens deprived of patterned vision by binocular lid suture for 1 week or 2 weeks and with arbors obtained in age-matched normal controls support the notion that competitive mechanisms rather than sensory disuse are responsible for gross morphological remodeling of geningal arbors.

Permanent perceptual and neurophysiological effects of visual deprivation in the cat

It is concluded that when forced to use an eye which influences only a small number of neurons, all of which have abnormal receptive fields, animals can learn a wide variety of form problems, but only by using local flux cues.

Loss of a specific cell type from dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus in visually deprived cats.

Evidence is presented that one effect of rearing cats with visual deprivation is the selective elimination from the LGNd of Y-cells, and the remaining neurons appear to be functionally normal.
...

References

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THIS book is not a general treatise on vision, but in deals with some additions to visual physiology in the last fifteen years that have been derived from the study of action potentials of the retina

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In transneuronal changes affecting these cell groups, there is evidence that after long survival periods the large cells are less severely affected, and it is sought to determine whether these differences are apparent from the beginning and continue through all stages of the degenerative process.

Single unit activity in lateral geniculate body and optic tract of unrestrained cats

  • D. Hubel
  • Biology
    The Journal of physiology
  • 1960
Methods for stereotaxic depth recordings in the unanaesthetized unrestrained animal were developed in order to make cortical and depth studies under similar conditions and make it possible to record from single units from virtually any part of the brain of the freely moving animal.

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The present investigation, made in acute preparations, includes a study of receptive fields of cells in the cat's striate cortex, which resembled retinal ganglion-cell receptive fields, but the shape and arrangement of excitatory and inhibitory areas differed strikingly from the concentric pattern found in retinalganglion cells.

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  • Biology
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  • 1959
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The writer is greatly indebted to Professor K. S. Lashley for aid in planning and carrying out these experiments and in the writing of this report.