EARLY RESPONSES TO VIRGIL'S FOURTH ECLOGUE

@article{Houghton2018EARLYRT,
  title={EARLY RESPONSES TO VIRGIL'S FOURTH ECLOGUE},
  author={L. Houghton},
  journal={Greece and Rome},
  year={2018},
  volume={65},
  pages={189 - 204}
}
The fourth Eclogue presents itself explicitly as a political poem, a loftier intervention in the humble world of pastoral poetry (4.1–3). This grander type of pastoral, moreover, is singled out as possessing a specifically Roman political significance: these ‘woods’ are to be ‘worthy of a consul’ (silvae sint consule dignae, 3), and the coming Golden Age is set within a precisely identifiable political context, the consulship of C. Asinius Pollio in 40 bc (te consule, 4.11). Beyond that… Expand
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