EARLY PRIMARY SUCCESSION ON MOUNT ST. HELENS: IMPACT OF INSECT HERBIVORES ON COLONIZING LUPINES

@article{Bishop2002EARLYPS,
  title={EARLY PRIMARY SUCCESSION ON MOUNT ST. HELENS: IMPACT OF INSECT HERBIVORES ON COLONIZING LUPINES},
  author={J. G. Bishop},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={2002},
  volume={83},
  pages={191-202}
}
  • J. Bishop
  • Published 2002
  • Environmental Science
  • Ecology
Bishop, J.G. 2002. Early primary succession on Mount St. Helens: impact of insect herbivores on colonizing lupines. Ecology 83: 191-202. 

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