E. LATUNDE ODEKU: THE FIRST AFRICAN‐AMERICAN NEUROSURGEON TRAINED IN THE UNITED STATES

@article{McClelland2007ELO,
  title={E. LATUNDE ODEKU: THE FIRST AFRICAN‐AMERICAN NEUROSURGEON TRAINED IN THE UNITED STATES},
  author={Shearwood McClelland and Kimbra S. Harris},
  journal={Neurosurgery},
  year={2007},
  volume={60},
  pages={769–772}
}
The advances of the Civil Rights movement in the mid-20th century and the success of the first African-American neurosurgeons trained at the Montreal Neurological Institute have led to a number of African-Americans receiving neurosurgery training within the United States. [] Key Method Born on June 29, 1927 in Lagos, Nigeria, Dr. Odeku received his M.D. from the Howard University College of Medicine in 1954. He spent the next year at the University of Michigan under the tutelage of Edgar A. Kahn, chief of…

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