Dystonia and the cerebellum: A new field of interest in movement disorders?

@article{Filip2013DystoniaAT,
  title={Dystonia and the cerebellum: A new field of interest in movement disorders?},
  author={Pavel Filip and Ovidiu V. Lungu and Martin Bare{\vs}},
  journal={Clinical Neurophysiology},
  year={2013},
  volume={124},
  pages={1269-1276}
}
Although dystonia has traditionally been regarded as a basal ganglia dysfunction, recent provocative evidence has emerged of cerebellar involvement in the pathophysiology of this enigmatic disease. This review synthesizes the data suggesting that the cerebellum plays an important role in dystonia etiology, from neuroanatomical research of complex networks showing that the cerebellum is connected to a wide range of other central nervous system structures involved in movement control to animal… Expand
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