Dynamical evidence for Phobos and Deimos as remnants of a disrupted common progenitor

@article{Bagheri2021DynamicalEF,
  title={Dynamical evidence for Phobos and Deimos as remnants of a disrupted common progenitor},
  author={Amirhossein Bagheri and Amir Khan and Michael Efroimsky and M. I. Kruglyakov and Domenico Giardini},
  journal={Nature Astronomy},
  year={2021}
}
<p>The origin of the Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, remains elusive. While the morphology and their cratered surfaces suggest an asteroidal origin, capture has been questioned because of potential dynamical difficulties in achieving the current near-circular, near-equatorial orbits. To circumvent this, in situ formation models have been proposed as alternatives. Yet, explaining the present location of the moons on opposite sides of the synchronous radius, their small sizes and apparent… 
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