Dynamic model of the octopus arm. I. Biomechanics of the octopus reaching movement.

@article{Yekutieli2005DynamicMO,
  title={Dynamic model of the octopus arm. I. Biomechanics of the octopus reaching movement.},
  author={Y. Yekutieli and Roni Sagiv-Zohar and R. Aharonov and Y. Engel and B. Hochner and T. Flash},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={94 2},
  pages={
          1443-58
        }
}
The octopus arm requires special motor control schemes because it consists almost entirely of muscles and lacks a rigid skeletal support. Here we present a 2D dynamic model of the octopus arm to explore possible strategies of movement control in this muscular hydrostat. The arm is modeled as a multisegment structure, each segment containing longitudinal and transverse muscles and maintaining a constant volume, a prominent feature of muscular hydrostats. The input to the model is the degree of… Expand
180 Citations
Dynamic model of the octopus arm. II. Control of reaching movements.
  • 80
  • PDF
Kinematic decomposition and classification of octopus arm movements
  • 24
  • PDF
Hydrodynamic analysis of octopus-like robotic arms
  • 21
  • Highly Influenced
Octopus-inspired multi-arm robotic swimming.
  • 26
  • PDF
Computing with a muscular-hydrostat system
  • 27
Motor control pathways in the nervous system of Octopus vulgaris arm
  • 6
  • PDF
Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend propagation and arm elongation.
  • 9
  • PDF
Analyzing octopus movements using three-dimensional reconstruction.
  • 33
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
Dynamic model of the octopus arm. II. Control of reaching movements.
  • 80
  • PDF
Organization of Octopus Arm Movements: A Model System for Studying the Control of Flexible Arms
  • 126
  • PDF
Patterns of Arm Muscle Activation Involved in Octopus Reaching Movements
  • 101
  • PDF
Biomechanics of a muscular hydrostat: a model of lapping by a reptilian tongue
  • 38
Neuromuscular system of the flexible arm of the octopus: physiological characterization.
  • 51
  • PDF
Tongues, tentacles and trunks: the biomechanics of movement in muscular‐hydrostats
  • 711
  • Highly Influential
A model of the hydrostatic skeleton of the leech.
  • 53
Biomechanical properties and a kinetic simulation model of the smooth muscle I2 in the buccal mass of Aplysia
  • 26
  • Highly Influential
Control of Octopus Arm Extension by a Peripheral Motor Program
  • 199
  • PDF
Simulating the motion of the leech: A biomechanical application of DAEs
  • 15
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
5
...