Duration of sympatry and coevolution between the great spotted cuckoo and its magpie host

@article{Soler1990DurationOS,
  title={Duration of sympatry and coevolution between the great spotted cuckoo and its magpie host},
  author={Manuel Soler and Anders Pape M{\o}ller},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1990},
  volume={343},
  pages={748-750}
}
PARASITIC cuckoos habitually lay their eggs in the nests of one or more host species. Because changes in one member of a host-parasite pair select for changes in the other member, it has been suggested that there is a revolutionary arms race between cuckoos and their hosts1–6. Comparisons of host species with species unsuitable as hosts, and the finding of host species from allopatric populations that tolerate nonmimetic eggs better than do species from sympatric populations, indicates that… Expand
Adaptations in the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) to host eggs in a multiple‐hosts system of brood parasitism
The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus parasitism greatly reduces the reproductive success of its hosts and imposes strong selection pressure for hosts to evolve defences against parasitism, such as theExpand
No evidence for variable duration of sympatry between the great spotted cuckoo and its magpie host
TLDR
Field data do not support the existence of variations in the duration of sympatry at the two areas where the distributional ranges of the cuckoo and its hosts overlap, and reported differences in egg rejection by hosts might alternatively reflect flexible behavioural responses to the presence of the adult parasite near the nest. Expand
Brood-parasite interactions between great spotted cuckoos and magpies: a model system for studying coevolutionary relationships
TLDR
Novel coevolutionary insights emerge from the synthesis of the literature, including how the evolution of "Mafia" behaviour in cuckoos does not necessarily inhibit the development of host recognition and rejection of cuckoo offspring, and how different populations of black-billed magpies in Europe have evolved specific host traits as a result of interactions with the great spotted cuckOO. Expand
Evolution of host egg mimicry in a brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo
TLDR
Spectrophotometric techniques are used for the first time to quantify mimicry of parasitic eggs for eight different host species and suggest that colouration of Cl. glandarius eggs is an apomorphic trait, and that variation between eggs laid in South African and European host nests is due to genetic isolation among these populations and not due to variation in colouring of host eggs. Expand
Synchronization of laying by great spotted cuckoos and recognition ability of magpies
TLDR
It is found that, during the year of higher parasitism rate, there was an increase in the percentage of parasitic eggs laid before magpies started laying, however, the synchronization of laying was poor both years regardless of the differences in the Parasitism rate. Expand
THE BITTERLING–MUSSEL COEVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIP IN AREAS OF RECENT AND ANCIENT SYMPATRY
TLDR
Mussels were demonstrated to have evolved strong defenses to bitterling parasitism in the area of ancient sympatry, but have no such defenses in the large areas of Europe where bitterling are currently invasive. Expand
A comparative study of host selection in the European cuckoo Cuculus canorus
TLDR
The European cuckoo may benefit from selecting hosts with short nestling periods because such hosts provide food for their nestlings at a very high rate. Expand
LIFE HISTORY OF MAGPIE POPULATIONS SYMPATRIC OR ALLOPATRIC WITH THE BROOD PARASITIC GREAT SPOTTED CUCKOO
TLDR
Analysis of data from a Magpie population sympatric with the Great Spotted Cuckoo demonstrated that Magpies laying a large clutch suffer less from parasitism than do those laying a small clutch, because the first have a higher probability of successfully raising some of their own offspring. Expand
GENETIC AND GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN REJECTION BEHAVIOR OF CUCKOO EGGS BY EUROPEAN MAGPIE POPULATIONS: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF REJECTER‐GENE FLOW
TLDR
Differences in rejection rates of mimetic and nonmimetic model eggs that suggest the egg‐recognition ability of the host is genetically based, but is affected by a learning process for fine tuning of recognition are discussed. Expand
Meadow pipit ( Anthus pratensis ) egg appearance in cuckoo ( Cuculus canorus ) sympatric and allopatric populations
TLDR
E egg phenotypes of a common host of the European cuckoo, Cuculus canorus, are investigated in the presence and in the absence of cuckoos by studying intraclutch variation in egg appearance, which is a genetically determined component of host defence favouring discrimination of parasitic eggs. Expand
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