Duration of Protection After Infant Hepatitis B Vaccination Series

@article{Middleman2014DurationOP,
  title={Duration of Protection After Infant Hepatitis B Vaccination Series},
  author={Amy B. Middleman and Carol J. Baker and Claudia A. Kozinetz and Saleem Kamili and Chi Nguyen and Dale J. Hu and Philip R Spradling},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2014},
  volume={133},
  pages={e1500 - e1507}
}
BACKGROUND: Little is known about duration of protection after the infant primary series of hepatitis B (HB) vaccine in settings of low HB endemicity. This study sought to determine the proportion of adolescents immunized as infants who had protective titers of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) before and after a challenge dose of vaccine. METHODS: US-born 16- through 19-year-olds who received a recombinant HB vaccine 3-dose series initiated within 7 days of birth (group 1) or… 

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