Dung fly struggles: A test of the war of attrition

@article{Parker2004DungFS,
  title={Dung fly struggles: A test of the war of attrition},
  author={Geoffrey Alan Parker and Elizabeth A. Thompson},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={7},
  pages={37-44}
}
Summary1.In Maynard Smith's ‘war of attrition’ model of animal conflict, two identical opponents fight over a unitary resource and the winner is the individual that is prepared to go on longer. The evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) is for individuals to vary in their selection of ‘bids’ (fighting durations) so that the probability density of bids follows a negative exponential distribution. In nature, the distribution of selected bids cannot be observed directly, because contests are… 

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