Dueling, Conflicting Masculinities, and the Victorian Gentleman

@article{Masterson2017DuelingCM,
  title={Dueling, Conflicting Masculinities, and the Victorian Gentleman},
  author={Margery Masterson},
  journal={Journal of British Studies},
  year={2017},
  volume={56},
  pages={605 - 628}
}
Abstract This article takes an unexplored popular debate from the 1860s over the role of dueling in regulating gentlemanly conduct as the starting point to examine the relationship between elite Victorian masculinities and interpersonal violence. In the absence of a meaningful replacement for dueling and other ritualized acts meant to defend personal honor, multiple modes of often conflicting masculinities became available to genteel men in the middle of the nineteenth century. Considering the… 
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