Dual ecological measures of focus in software development

@article{Posnett2013DualEM,
  title={Dual ecological measures of focus in software development},
  author={Daryl Posnett and Raissa M. D’Souza and Premkumar T. Devanbu and Vladimir Filkov},
  journal={2013 35th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE)},
  year={2013},
  pages={452-461}
}
Work practices vary among software developers. Some are highly focused on a few artifacts; others make wideranging contributions. Similarly, some artifacts are mostly authored, or “owned”, by one or few developers; others have very wide ownership. Focus and ownership are related but different phenomena, both with strong effect on software quality. Prior studies have mostly targeted ownership; the measures of ownership used have generally been based on either simple counts, information-theoretic… 

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