Drugs abused by humans preferentially increase synaptic dopamine concentrations in the mesolimbic system of freely moving rats.

@article{Chiara1988DrugsAB,
  title={Drugs abused by humans preferentially increase synaptic dopamine concentrations in the mesolimbic system of freely moving rats.},
  author={Gaetano Di Chiara and Assunta Imperato},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1988},
  volume={85 14},
  pages={5274-8}
}
The effect of various drugs on the extracellular concentration of dopamine in two terminal dopaminergic areas, the nucleus accumbens septi (a limbic area) and the dorsal caudate nucleus (a subcortical motor area), was studied in freely moving rats by using brain dialysis. Drugs abused by humans (e.g., opiates, ethanol, nicotine, amphetamine, and cocaine) increased extracellular dopamine concentrations in both areas, but especially in the accumbens, and elicited hypermotility at low doses. On… CONTINUE READING
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Brain Res . 94 , 507 - 522

P. W. Seviour
1975

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