Drug therapy and memory training programs: a double-blind randomized trial of general practice patients with age-associated memory impairment.

Abstract

A double-blind randomized trial was performed involving 162 patients with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) selected and followed by their general practitioners. Two intervention methods--a drug and a cognitive therapy--were assessed in combination. Three randomized parallel groups of 54 patients each, aged 55 years and over, were followed and treated for 3 months. After a placebo wash-out period of 10 days, one group received 2.4 g of piracetam, another group, 4.8g, and the third, a placebo. A total of 135 patients, 45 in each group, completed the study. Combined therapy was most effective in patients whose baseline performance on memory tests was lowest. The best results were observed with 4.8 g of piracetam, especially when training sessions began after 6 weeks of drug treatment. This result was confirmed by the global impression of the principal investigator.

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@article{Israel1994DrugTA, title={Drug therapy and memory training programs: a double-blind randomized trial of general practice patients with age-associated memory impairment.}, author={Liliane Israel and Michel M{\'e}lac and D Milinkevitch and Gregory F. Dubos}, journal={International psychogeriatrics}, year={1994}, volume={6 2}, pages={155-70} }