Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis

@article{Perazella2010DruginducedAI,
  title={Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis},
  author={Mark A Perazella and Glen S. Markowitz},
  journal={Nature Reviews Nephrology},
  year={2010},
  volume={6},
  pages={461-470}
}
Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury. Many etiologies of AIN have been recognized—including allergic/drug-induced, infectious, autoimmune/systemic, and idiopathic forms of disease. The most common etiology of AIN is drug-induced disease, which is thought to underlie 60–70% of cases. Multiple agents from many different classes of drugs can cause AIN, and the clinical presentation and laboratory findings vary according to the class of drug involved. AIN is… Expand
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Clinicians must differentiate the various causes of hospital-induced AKI; however, it is often difficult to distinguish AIN from ATN in such patients and kidney biopsy is often required to accurately diagnose AIN and guide management. Expand
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