Drug Injectors and the Cleaning of Needles and Syringes

@article{Hughes2000DrugIA,
  title={Drug Injectors and the Cleaning of Needles and Syringes},
  author={Robert A Hughes},
  journal={European Addiction Research},
  year={2000},
  volume={6},
  pages={20 - 30}
}
  • R. Hughes
  • Published 1 March 2000
  • Medicine
  • European Addiction Research
When people share needles and syringes they risk transmitting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Cleaning needles and syringes can help to reduce, although not eliminate, these risks. This article begins by engaging with some of the literature on the cleaning of needles and syringes. Drawing on qualitative research conducted with drug injectors in England, the article then goes on to explore drug injectors… 

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