Drug-Induced Hyperhidrosis and Hypohidrosis

@article{Cheshire2008DrugInducedHA,
  title={Drug-Induced Hyperhidrosis and Hypohidrosis},
  author={William P. Cheshire and Robert D. Fealey},
  journal={Drug Safety},
  year={2008},
  volume={31},
  pages={109-126}
}
The human sweating response is subject to the influence of diverse classes of drugs. Some act centrally at the hypothalamus or at spinal thermoregulatory centres, while others act at sympathetic ganglia or at the eccrine-neuroeffector junction. Pharmacological disturbances of sweating have broad clinical implications. Drugs that induce hyperhidrosis, or sweating in excess of that needed to maintain thermoregulation, can cause patient discomfort and embarrassment, and include cholinesterase… Expand

Paper Mentions

Use of multiple anticholinergic medications can predispose patients to severe non-exertional hyperthermia
TLDR
This patients’ multiple anticholinergic medications increased her susceptibility to develop NEHT by inhibited sweating, this patient’s natural cooling mechanism. Expand
Aripiprazole-Induced Hyperhidrosis : Two Case Reports 2
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TLDR
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TLDR
The mechanism explaining sweating could be similar to the one suggested forhyperhidrosis related to serotonin uptake inhibitors, because this hyperhidrosis is episodic, nocturnal, and dose dependent. Expand
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A woman with a history of opioid use disorder who experienced hyperhidrosis in the setting of partial opioid agonist and opioid antagonist therapy (buprenorphine-naloxone) is presented and treated successfully with oral oxybutynin 5 mg daily. Expand
Neurological Disorders Associated with Sweating
TLDR
Treatement for hyperhidrosis include topical agents, botulinum toxin A injections, systemic anticholinergics, and sympathectomy. Expand
Sudomotor Dysfunction.
TLDR
Assessment of sudomotor dysfunction is important to recognize, as it not only correlates with symptoms of heat intolerance but may also place the patient at risk for heat stroke when under conditions of heat stress. Expand
Glycopyrrolate-induced craniofacial compensatory hyperhidrosis successfully treated with oxybutynin: report of a novel adverse effect and subsequent successful treatment.
TLDR
A 32-year-old woman with a history of palmoplantar hyperhidrosis for 15 years who presented for treatment and was prescribed oral glycopyrrolate developed new persistent craniofacial sweating and a rare drug adverse effect with successful treatment is reported. Expand
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