Drug Addiction, Dysregulation of Reward, and Allostasis

@article{Koob2001DrugAD,
  title={Drug Addiction, Dysregulation of Reward, and Allostasis},
  author={George F. Koob and Michel le Moal},
  journal={Neuropsychopharmacology},
  year={2001},
  volume={24},
  pages={97-129}
}
  • G. Koob, M. Moal
  • Published 1 February 2001
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Neuropsychopharmacology

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