Drosophila CRY Is a Deep Brain Circadian Photoreceptor

@article{Emery2000DrosophilaCI,
  title={Drosophila CRY Is a Deep Brain Circadian Photoreceptor},
  author={Patrick Emery and Ralf Stanewsky and Charlotte Helfrich-F{\"o}rster and Myai Emery-Le and Jeffrey C. Hall and Michael Rosbash},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2000},
  volume={26},
  pages={493-504}
}
cry (cryptochrome) is an important clock gene, and recent data indicate that it encodes a critical circadian photoreceptor in Drosophila. A mutant allele, cry(b), inhibits circadian photoresponses. Restricting CRY expression to specific fly tissues shows that CRY expression is needed in a cell-autonomous fashion for oscillators present in different locations. CRY overexpression in brain pacemaker cells increases behavioral photosensitivity, and this restricted CRY expression also rescues all… Expand
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