Driver Ants Invading a Termite Nest : Why Do the Most Catholic Predators of All Seldom Take This Abundant Prey ?

@inproceedings{Schning2007DriverAI,
  title={Driver Ants Invading a Termite Nest : Why Do the Most Catholic Predators of All Seldom Take This Abundant Prey ?},
  author={Caspar Sch{\"o}ning},
  year={2007}
}
Driver ants (i.e., epigaeic species in the army ant genus Dorylus, subgenus Anomma) are among the most extreme polyphagous predators, but termites appear to be conspicuously absent from their prey spectrum and attacks by driver ants on termite nests have not yet been described. Here, we report a Dorylus (Anomma) rubellus attack on a colony of the fungus-growing termite Macrotermes subhyalinus that was observed during the dry season in a savannah habitat in Nigeria’s Gashaka National Park. It… CONTINUE READING
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