Drinking problems on a ‘simple’ diet: physiological convergence in nectar-feeding birds

@article{Nicolson2014DrinkingPO,
  title={Drinking problems on a ‘simple’ diet: physiological convergence in nectar-feeding birds},
  author={Susan W. Nicolson and Patricia A. Fleming},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={217},
  pages={1015 - 1023}
}
Regulation of energy and water are by necessity closely linked in avian nectarivores, because the easily available sugars in nectar are accompanied by an excess of water but few electrolytes. In general, there is convergence in morphology and physiology between three main lineages of avian nectarivores that have evolved on different continents – the hummingbirds, sunbirds and honeyeaters. These birds show similar dependence of sugar preferences on nectar concentration, high intestinal sucrase… Expand
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