Drinking Water Is Associated With Weight Loss in Overweight Dieting Women Independent of Diet and Activity

@article{Stookey2008DrinkingWI,
  title={Drinking Water Is Associated With Weight Loss in Overweight Dieting Women Independent of Diet and Activity},
  author={Jodi D. Stookey and Florence Constant and Barry M. Popkin and Christopher D. Gardner},
  journal={Obesity},
  year={2008},
  volume={16}
}
BACKGROUND Data from short-term experiments suggest that drinking water may promote weight loss by lowering total energy intake and/or altering metabolism. [] Key MethodMETHODS AND PROCEDURES Secondary analyses were conducted on data from the Stanford A TO Z weight loss intervention on 173 premenopausal overweight women (aged 25-50 years) who reported <1 l/day drinking water at baseline.

Drinking extra water or other non-caloric beverages for promoting weight loss or preventing weight gain

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of drinking extra water or other non-caloric beverages for promoting weight loss or

Effect of increased intake of skimmed milk, casein, whey or water on body composition and leptin in overweight adolescents: a randomized trial

Dairy proteins may support muscle protein synthesis and improve satiety in adults. However, there are limited studies using exact measures of body composition, especially in adolescents.

The Efficacy of Increased Water Consumption as a Weight Loss Strategy

References 1. Flegal KM, Carroll MD, Ogden CL, et al. Prevalence and trends in obesity among US adults, 1999-2008. Jama.303(3):235-241. 2. Roberts SB, Dallal GE. Energy requirements and aging. Public

Effects on weight loss in adults of replacing diet beverages with water during a hypoenergetic diet: a randomized, 24-wk clinical trial.

Replacement of DBs with water after the main meal may lead to greater weight reduction during a weight-loss program and may also offer clinical benefits to improve insulin resistance.

Effects on weight loss in adults of replacing diet beverages with water during a hypoenergetic diet : a randomized , 24-wk clinical trial 1

Replacement of DBs with water after the main meal may lead to greater weight reduction during a weight-loss program and may also offer clinical benefits to improve insulin resistance.

Substitution Models of Water for Other Beverages, and the Incidence of Obesity and Weight Gain in the SUN Cohort

Replacing one sugar-sweetened soda beverage or beer with one serving of water per day at baseline was related to a lower incidence of obesity and to a higher weight loss over a four-year period time in the case of beer, based on mathematical models.

Obesity & Weight loss Therapy

It is suggested that obese women using ROIFW may augment weight loss when combined with hypocaloric diet and physical activity, and more extensive data are warranted to confirm these findings.

Negative, Null and Beneficial Effects of Drinking Water on Energy Intake, Energy Expenditure, Fat Oxidation and Weight Change in Randomized Trials: A Qualitative Review

This qualitative review of RCTs was to identify conditions associated with negative, null and beneficial effects of drinking water on EI, EE, FO and weight, to generate hypotheses about ways to optimize drinking water interventions for weight management.

Drinking Water and Weight Management

There is a strong evidence base for recommending drinking water for weight management and in intervention studies, advice to drink water is associated with reduced weight gain in children and greater weight loss in dieting adults.

Beyond the Role of Dietary Protein and Amino Acids in the Prevention of Diet-Induced Obesity

Studies showing a connection between high protein or total amino nitrogen intake and obligatory water intake are reviewed to provide important information to justify dietary recommendations and strategies in promoting long-term weight loss and to reduce health problems associated with the comorbidities of obesity.
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Replacing Sweetened Caloric Beverages with Drinking Water Is Associated with Lower Energy Intake

Replacing SCBs with non‐caloric diet beverages does not automatically lower energy intake, however, and compensatory increases in other food or beverages reportedly negate benefits of diet beverages.

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