Dreaming and waking: Similarities and differences revisited

@article{Kahan2011DreamingAW,
  title={Dreaming and waking: Similarities and differences revisited},
  author={T. Kahan and S. Laberge},
  journal={Consciousness and Cognition},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={494-514}
}
Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive (HOC) skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan (2001). Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and… Expand
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