Dreaming and the brain: Toward a cognitive neuroscience of conscious states

@article{Hobson2000DreamingAT,
  title={Dreaming and the brain: Toward a cognitive neuroscience of conscious states},
  author={J. Allan Hobson and Edward F. Pace-Schott and Robert Stickgold},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={23},
  pages={793 - 842}
}
Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with… 
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