Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species

@article{Alstrm2015DramaticNS,
  title={Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species},
  author={P. Alstr{\"o}m and K. J{\o}nsson and J. Fjelds{\aa} and A. Ödeen and Per G. P. Ericson and M. Irestedt},
  journal={Royal Society Open Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={2}
}
  • P. Alström, K. Jønsson, +3 authors M. Irestedt
  • Published 2015
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Royal Society Open Science
  • Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family… CONTINUE READING
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