Dr. Kammerer's Testimony to the Inheritance of Acquired Characters

@article{BatesonDrKT,
  title={Dr. Kammerer's Testimony to the Inheritance of Acquired Characters},
  author={W. Bateson},
  journal={Nature},
  volume={103},
  pages={344-345}
}
PROF. MACBRIDE'S letter in NATURE for May 22 last calls for some statement from me. When, in 1910, I was engaged in writing those chapters of my book, “Problems of Genetics” (1913), which deal with the effects of changed conditions in producing genetic variation, I endeavoured to form an opinion as to the validity of the cases usually claimed in recent years as having given positive results. I had no difficulty in showing that nearly all this evidence is unsubstantial. The copious and… Expand
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Did Paul Kammerer discover epigenetic inheritance? A modern look at the controversial midwife toad experiments.
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  • 2009
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Re-examination of Paul Kammerer's descriptions of hybrid crosses of treated and nontreated toads reveals parent-of-origin effects like those documented in epigenetic inheritance. Expand
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