Downstream migration and hematophagous feeding of newly metamorphosed sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, 1758)

@article{Silva2012DownstreamMA,
  title={Downstream migration and hematophagous feeding of newly metamorphosed sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, 1758)},
  author={S. Silva and Mar{\'i}a J. Servia and Rufino Vieira-Lanero and Fernando Cobo},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2012},
  volume={700},
  pages={277-286}
}
The metamorphosis of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, 1758) allows young postmetamorphic individuals to migrate to the sea and start the hematophagous feeding. However, the information about this phase is very limited, especially for European populations. Herein, we provide for the first time a comprehensive study on the phenology of downstream migration, the timing and location of first feeding and the prey species in the River Ulla and its estuary (NW Spain). Results show that… Expand

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