Down syndrome and cell-free fetal DNA in archived maternal serum.

@article{Lee2002DownSA,
  title={Down syndrome and cell-free fetal DNA in archived maternal serum.},
  author={Thomas Lee and Erik S. Leshane and Geralyn M Messerlian and Jacob A. Canick and Antonio Farina and Walter W Heber and Diana W. Bianchi},
  journal={American journal of obstetrics and gynecology},
  year={2002},
  volume={187 5},
  pages={
          1217-21
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Increased levels of cell-free fetal DNA (f-DNA) in the maternal circulation are a potential noninvasive marker for fetal Down syndrome. Our objectives were to (1) determine whether f-DNA could be quantified by using archived serum and amniotic fluid, (2) examine whether serum f-DNA levels are elevated in Down syndrome pregnancies in a case-control series matched for gestational age and duration of sample storage, and (3) determine whether f-DNA levels are elevated in the amniotic… 
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TLDR
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Applications of Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Serum
TLDR
The discovery of cffDNAcirculating in the maternal serum has opened the door to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis testing with novel clinicalimplications.
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