Down on heights? One in three has visual height intolerance

@article{Huppert2012DownOH,
  title={Down on heights? One in three has visual height intolerance},
  author={Doreen Huppert and Eva Grill and Thomas Brandt},
  journal={Journal of Neurology},
  year={2012},
  volume={260},
  pages={597-604}
}
The distressing phenomenon of visual height intolerance (vHI) occurs when a visual stimulus causes apprehension of losing control of balance and falling from some height. Epidemiological data of this condition in the general population are lacking. Assignment of prevalence, determinants, and compensation of vHI was performed in a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 3,517 individuals representing the German population. Life-time prevalence of vHI is 28 % (females 32 %). A higher prevalence… 
Fear of heights and visual height intolerance.
TLDR
This review aims to cover the different aspects of visual height intolerance such as historical descriptions, definition of terms, phenomenology of the condition, neurophysiological control of gaze, stance and locomotion, and therapy, and to identify warranted epidemiological and experimental studies.
Acrophobia and visual height intolerance: advances in epidemiology and mechanisms
TLDR
A differentiation should be made between behavioral recommendations for prevention and therapy of the condition and management of severely afflicted persons with distressing avoidance behavior, which mainly relies on behavioral therapy.
Fear of Heights and Visual Height Intolerance in Children 8 10 Years Old
Objective: To evaluate the prevalence, symptoms, spontaneous course, and behavioral consequences of visual height intolerance in children in comparison to adults. Methods: Survey in three primary
Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns
Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to
Susceptibility to Fear of Heights in Bilateral Vestibulopathy and Other Disorders of Vertigo and Balance
TLDR
The susceptibility to vHI in BVP was not higher than that of the general population (28%), which allows two explanations that need not be alternatives but contribute to each other: (1) Patients with a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit largely avoid exposure to heights because of their postural instability, and (2) the irrational anxiety to fall from heights triggers increased susceptibility tovHI.
Balance control and anti‐gravity muscle activity during the experience of fear at heights
TLDR
Visual heights have two behavioral effects in vHI subjects: a change occurs in open‐ and closed‐loop postural control strategy and co‐contraction of anti‐gravity leg and neck muscles, both of which depend on the severity of evoked fear at heights.
Self-Efficacy Beliefs Are Associated with Visual Height Intolerance: A Cross-Sectional Survey
TLDR
Evidence is provided for the association of GSE and vHI, and the findings may have consequences for strategies of alleviation and therapy of vHI.
Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: distressing partners for life
The course of illness, the degree of social impairment, and the rate of help-seeking behavior was evaluated in a sample of individuals with visual height intolerance (vHI) and acrophobia. On the
Quantification of gait changes in subjects with visual height intolerance when exposed to heights
TLDR
It is conceivable that mental distraction by dual task or increasing the walking speed might be useful recommendations to reduce the imbalance during locomotion in subjects susceptible to vHI.
Height intolerance between physiological mechanisms and psychological distress: a review of literature and our experience
TLDR
This study examines the physiological mechanisms underlying height intolerance and phobic-cognitive mechanisms leading to more severe clinical manifestations (i.e. acrophobia), and its own experience in treating patients with height intolerance is included.
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