Dose–response meta‐analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease

@article{Qi2014DoseresponseMO,
  title={Dose–response meta‐analysis on coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with risk of Parkinson's disease},
  author={Hui-quan Qi and Shixue Li},
  journal={Geriatrics \& Gerontology International},
  year={2014},
  volume={14}
}
  • Hui-quan Qi, Shixue Li
  • Published 1 April 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Geriatrics & Gerontology International
A dose–response meta‐analysis was carried out between Parkinson's disease (PD) risk, and coffee, tea and caffeine consumption. 
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