Dorsal and ventral streams: a framework for understanding aspects of the functional anatomy of language

@article{Hickok2004DorsalAV,
  title={Dorsal and ventral streams: a framework for understanding aspects of the functional anatomy of language},
  author={Gregory Hickok and David Poeppel},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2004},
  volume={92},
  pages={67-99}
}
Despite intensive work on language-brain relations, and a fairly impressive accumulation of knowledge over the last several decades, there has been little progress in developing large-scale models of the functional anatomy of language that integrate neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and psycholinguistic data. Drawing on relatively recent developments in the cortical organization of vision, and on data from a variety of sources, we propose a new framework for understanding aspects of the… Expand
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