Donor Milk: What's in It and What's Not

@article{Tully2001DonorMW,
  title={Donor Milk: What's in It and What's Not},
  author={Dorothy Tully and Frances Jones and Mary Rose Tully},
  journal={Journal of Human Lactation},
  year={2001},
  volume={17},
  pages={152 - 155}
}
Breastfeeding and human milk are widely recognized as optimal for human infants. However, if donor milk is used when mother's own milk is not available, some questions arise concerning the effects of storage, handling, and heat processing on the unique components of human milk. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C for 30 minutes) of banked human milk is the method of choice to eliminate potential viral contaminants such as human immunodeficiency virus, human T-lymphoma virus, and cytomegalovirus, as… Expand
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