Don't mind me touching my wrist: a case study of interacting with on-body technology in public

@inproceedings{Profita2013DontMM,
  title={Don't mind me touching my wrist: a case study of interacting with on-body technology in public},
  author={Halley P. Profita and James Clawson and Scott M. Gilliland and Clint Zeagler and Thad Starner and Jim Budd and Ellen Yi-Luen Do},
  booktitle={ISWC '13},
  year={2013}
}
Wearable technology, specifically e-textiles, offers the potential for interacting with electronic devices in a whole new manner. However, some may find the operation of a system that employs non-traditional on-body interactions uncomfortable to perform in a public setting, impacting how readily a new form of mobile technology may be received. Thus, it is important for interaction designers to take into consideration the implications of on-body gesture interactions when designing wearable… 

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