Don’t Believe What You Read (Only Once)

@article{Schotter2014DontBW,
  title={Don’t Believe What You Read (Only Once)},
  author={Elizabeth Schotter and Randy Tran and Keith Rayner},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={1218 - 1226}
}
Recent Web apps have spurred excitement around the prospect of achieving speed reading by eliminating eye movements (i.e., with rapid serial visual presentation, or RSVP, in which words are presented briefly one at a time and sequentially). Our experiment using a novel trailing-mask paradigm contradicts these claims. Subjects read normally or while the display of text was manipulated such that each word was masked once the reader’s eyes moved past it. This manipulation created a scenario… 

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