Dominican-American Ethnic/ Racial Identities and United States Social Categories

@article{Bailey2001DominicanAmericanER,
  title={Dominican-American Ethnic/ Racial Identities and United States Social Categories},
  author={B. Bailey},
  journal={International Migration Review},
  year={2001},
  volume={35},
  pages={677 - 708}
}
  • B. Bailey
  • Published 2001
  • Sociology
  • International Migration Review
The majority of Dominicans have sub-Saharan African ancestry,1 which would make them “black” by historical United States ‘one-drop' rules. Second generation Dominican high school students in Providence, Rhode Island do not identity their race in terms of black or white, but rather in terms of ethnolinguistic identity, as Dominican/Spanish/Hispanic. The distinctiveness of Dominican-American understandings of race is highlighted by comparing them with those of non-Hispanic, African descent second… Expand
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