Domestic Phantasmagoria: The Victorian Literary Domestic and Experimental Visuality

@article{Groth2009DomesticPT,
  title={Domestic Phantasmagoria: The Victorian Literary Domestic and Experimental Visuality},
  author={Helen Groth},
  journal={South Atlantic Quarterly},
  year={2009},
  volume={108},
  pages={147-169}
}
  • Helen Groth
  • Published 21 December 2009
  • Art
  • South Atlantic Quarterly
Illusion is a source of trauma in the opening sections of Harriet Martineau’s Autobiography. One encounter with a domestic magic lantern sends Martineau into a state of high anxiety. In its dismantled state, the lantern holds no mysteries for her. She recalls seeing it cleaned by daylight, handling all its parts, and “understanding its whole structure.” It was a different story at night, in a darkened room, when “my panics were really unaccountable. They were a matter of pure sensation without… 
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References

A Theory of Literary Production
I Some Elementary Concepts 1. Criticism and Judgement 2. Domain and Object 3. Questions and Answers 4. Rule and Law 5. Positive and Negative Judgement 6. Front and Back 7. Improvisation, Structure