Domain-specific cognitive systems: insight from Grammatical-SLI

@article{Lely2005DomainspecificCS,
  title={Domain-specific cognitive systems: insight from Grammatical-SLI},
  author={Heather K. J. van der Lely},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={9},
  pages={53-59}
}
  • H. V. D. Lely
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Specific language-impairment (SLI) is a disorder of language acquisition in children who otherwise appear to be normally developing. Controversy surrounds whether SLI results from impairment to a "domain-specific" system devoted to language itself or from some more "domain-general" system. I compare these two views of SLI, and focus on three components of grammar that are good candidates for domain-specificity: syntax, morphology and phonology. I argue that the disorder is heterogeneous, and… 
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