Doing well by doing good. The relationship between formal volunteering and self-reported health and happiness.

@article{Borgonovi2008DoingWB,
  title={Doing well by doing good. The relationship between formal volunteering and self-reported health and happiness.},
  author={Francesca Borgonovi},
  journal={Social science \& medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={66 11},
  pages={
          2321-34
        }
}
  • F. Borgonovi
  • Published 1 June 2008
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • Social science & medicine
In this paper, we examine whether engaging in voluntary work leads to greater well-being, as measured by self-reported health and happiness. Drawing on data from the USA, our estimates suggest that people who volunteer report better health and greater happiness than people who do not, a relationship that is not driven by socio-economic differences between volunteers and non-volunteers. We concentrate on voluntary labor for religious groups and organizations and using second stage least square… Expand
Volunteering and Happiness: Examining the Differential Effects of Volunteering Types According to Household Income
Although it is well known that volunteering is associated with happiness, little has been examined regarding associations between volunteering and happiness according to the type of volunteering andExpand
Religion, Volunteerism and Health: Are Religious People Really Doing Well by Doing Good?
While the religion-health connection has been accumulatively established by research findings in one hand, the contribution of volunteering to health is well confirmed empirically on the other hand.Expand
Doing good, feeling good: causal evidence from volunteers
Volunteers are reputedly healthier and happier than their non-volunteering counterparts. But is this a causal link or are healthier, happy individuals simply more likely to volunteer? Some papersExpand
Health Outcomes and Volunteering: The Moderating Role of Religiosity
In this paper, we examine whether and what extent public and private forms of religiosity act as moderators of the volunteering and well-being relationship in mid- to later-life. We use data from theExpand
Voluntary Activities and Daily Happiness in the Us
This paper analyzes differences in daily happiness between those individuals in the United States who perform voluntary activities during the day, and those who do not. Using the Well-Being Module ofExpand
Volunteering predicts happiness among older Māori and non-Māori in the New Zealand health, work, and retirement longitudinal study
TLDR
Evidence that volunteering is related to increased happiness, irrespective of ethnicity is provided, and further evidence that the relationship between volunteering and happiness is moderated by economic resources is provided. Expand
Participation in socially-productive activities, reciprocity and wellbeing in later life: baseline results in England
ABSTRACT This paper examines whether participation in social activities is associated with higher levels of wellbeing among post-retirement age people in England, and, if so, whether theseExpand
Employee Volunteering: Does Giving Your Time Give You Better Wellbeing
Employee volunteering is a prosocial act associated with positive outcomes for the beneficiaries, the company and the individual volunteer. Research repeatedly demonstrates a positive relationshipExpand
Working, Volunteering and Mental Health in the Later Years
This paper examines the effect that working for pay and volunteering has on the mental health of older Irish women and men. Data from four waves of The Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA) areExpand
Does the Relation between Volunteering and Well-Being Vary with Health and Age?
TLDR
Cross-sectional data from the 2008 Arizona Health Survey provided no support for the hypothesis that age moderates the association between volunteer status and positive affect, negative affect, and resilience, and there was a significant interaction between Volunteer status and chronic health conditions on positive affect and resilience. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 49 REFERENCES
Volunteer work and well-being.
Using two waves of panel data from Americans' Changing Lives (House 1995) (N = 2,681), we examine the relationships between volunteer work in the community and six aspects of personal well-being:Expand
Volunteering and mortality among older adults: findings from a national sample.
  • M. Musick, A. Herzog, J. House
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 1999
TLDR
Volunteering has a protective effect on mortality among those who volunteered for one organization or for forty hours or less over the past year, and the protective effects of volunteering are strongest for respondents who report low levels of informal social interaction and who do not live alone. Expand
The Beneficial Effects of Volunteering for Older Volunteers and the People They Serve: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
This meta-analysis of thirty-seven independent studies provided the means of inferring not only that elder volunteers' sense of well-being seemed to be significantly bolstered through volunteering, but also that such relatively healthy older people represent a significant adjunct resource for meeting some of the service needs of more vulnerable elders, as well as those of other similarly vulnerable groups such as disabled children. Expand
Volunteering and Depression in Later Life: Social Benefit or Selection Processes?∗
TLDR
Three-wave data from the Americans' Changing Lives study reveal a beneficial effect of formal volunteering on depression, but not for informal helping, suggesting voluntarism as a means of compensation. Expand
Volunteering and depression: the role of psychological and social resources in different age groups.
TLDR
Analysis of three waves of data from the Americans' Changing Lives data set reveals that volunteering does lower depression levels for those over 65, while prolonged exposure to volunteering benefits both populations. Expand
Divided We Stand, United We Fall: Religious Pluralism, Giving, and Volunteering
This article examines to what extent religious context influences giving to, and volunteering for, religious causes—both directly and through increased attendance at religious services—and whether itExpand
The social context of well-being.
  • J. Helliwell, R. Putnam
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
This work confirms that social capital is strongly linked to subjective well-being through many independent channels and in several different forms, both directly and through their impact on health. Expand
Volunteerism and Mortality among the Community-dwelling Elderly
TLDR
Lower mortality rates for community service volunteers were only partly explained by health habits, physical functioning, religious attendance, and social support, while volunteering was slightly more protective for those with high religious involvement and perceived social support. Expand
Altruism, happiness, and health: it’s good to be good
  • S. Post
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of behavioral medicine
  • 2005
TLDR
It is concluded that a strong correlation exists between the well-being, happiness, health, and longevity of people who are emotionally and behaviorally compassionate, so long as they are not overwhelmed by helping tasks. Expand
Covariation in the socioeconomic determinants of self rated health and happiness: a multivariate multilevel analysis of individuals and communities in the USA
TLDR
Poor health and unhappiness are highly positively correlated within individuals, and communities that are healthier tend to be happier and vice versa. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...