Doing Well by Making Well: The Impact of Corporate Wellness Programs on Employee Productivity

@article{Gubler2018DoingWB,
  title={Doing Well by Making Well: The Impact of Corporate Wellness Programs on Employee Productivity},
  author={Timothy Gubler and Ian Larkin and Lamar Pierce},
  journal={Manag. Sci.},
  year={2018},
  volume={64},
  pages={4967-4987}
}
This paper provides the first evidence linking a panel of individual medical data from a corporate wellness program with objective productivity improvements in industrial workers. Almost 90% of companies use corporate wellness programs designed to improve employee health. Existing research has focused on measuring cost savings from reduced insurance rates and absenteeism. In contrast, our paper explains and empirically tests how wellness programs can improve employee productivity, and thereby… 

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