Dog's gaze at its owner increases owner's urinary oxytocin during social interaction

@article{Nagasawa2009DogsGA,
  title={Dog's gaze at its owner increases owner's urinary oxytocin during social interaction},
  author={Miho Nagasawa and Takefumi Kikusui and Tatsushi Onaka and Mitsuaki Ohta},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2009},
  volume={55},
  pages={434-441}
}
Oxytocin (OT) has been shown to play an important role in social bonding in animals. However, it is unclear whether OT is related to inter-species social bonding. In this study, to examine the possibility that urinary OT concentrations of owners were increased by their "dog's gaze", perhaps representing social attachment to their owners, we measured urinary OT concentrations of owners before and after interaction with their dogs. Dog owners interacted with their dogs as usual for 30 min… Expand
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