Does the presence of non-breeders enhance the fitness of breeders? An experimental analysis in the clown anemonefish Amphiprion percula

@article{Buston2004DoesTP,
  title={Does the presence of non-breeders enhance the fitness of breeders? An experimental analysis in the clown anemonefish Amphiprion percula},
  author={Peter M. Buston},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={57},
  pages={23-31}
}
  • P. Buston
  • Published 18 August 2004
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
The stability of animal societies depends on individuals’ decisions about whether to tolerate or evict others and about whether to stay or leave. These decisions, in turn, depend on individuals’ costs and benefits of living in the group. The clown anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, lives in groups composed of a breeding pair and zero to four non-breeders. To determine why breeders accept the presence of non-breeders in this species I investigated the effect of non-breeders on multiple components… Expand

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