Does the oxidative stress theory of aging explain longevity differences in birds? I. Mitochondrial ROS production

@article{Montgomery2012DoesTO,
  title={Does the oxidative stress theory of aging explain longevity differences in birds? I. Mitochondrial ROS production},
  author={Magdalene K. Montgomery and A. J. Hulbert and William A. Buttemer},
  journal={Experimental Gerontology},
  year={2012},
  volume={47},
  pages={203-210}
}
Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates are reported to be inversely related to maximum lifespan potential (MLSP) in mammals and also to be higher in short-living mammals compared to short-living birds. The mammal-bird comparison, however, is mainly based on studies of rats and pigeons. To date, there has been no systematic examination of ROS production in birds that differ in MLSP. Here we report a comparison of mitochondrial ROS production in two short-living (quails) and… 
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TLDR
Only glutathione peroxidase was consistently higher in tissues of the long-living parrots and suggests higher protection against the harmful effects of hydroperoxides, which might be important for parrot longevity.
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