Does the cuckoo benefit from laying unusually strong eggs?

@article{Antonov2008DoesTC,
  title={Does the cuckoo benefit from laying unusually strong eggs?},
  author={Anton Antonov and B{\aa}rd G Stokke and Arne Moksnes and Eivin R{\o}skaft},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={76},
  pages={1893-1900}
}
Keeping eggs warm: thermal and developmental advantages for parasitic cuckoos of laying unusually thick-shelled eggs
TLDR
There was a thermal and hence a developmental advantage for brood parasitic cuckoos of laying thick-shelled eggs, providing another possible explanation for the unusually thick- shelled eggs of obligate brood parasites and earlier hatching of cuckoo eggs compared to those of the host.
Eggshell characteristics and yolk composition in the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus: are they adapted to brood parasitism?
TLDR
The results suggest that cuckoo females increase the size, growth rate and competitive ability of their young by providing them with more nutrients and more dietary antioxidants for embryonic development, and not through elevated yolk testosterone or antibody levels.
Why do brood parasitic birds lay strong-shelled eggs?
TLDR
How quanti-cation of rejection modes (grasp ejection, puncture ejection and desertion) may disclose the validity of the puncture resistance hypothesis is discussed, and proposals for future studies to test their validity are provided.
Egg laying behavior of common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus): Data based on field video-recordings
TLDR
It is concluded that common cuckoos change their behavior when hosts are present at the nest, with a set of behaviors performed to deal with host attack and successfully complete parasitic egg-laying regardless of time of day.
Post-ejection nest-desertion of common cuckoo hosts: a second defense mechanism or avoiding reduced reproductive success?
TLDR
It is concluded that post-ejection nest-desertion is not a second antiparasite mechanism, which might serve as a redundant antiparAsite defense, but a reaction to typically small and further decreased clutch size.
Evidence for egg discrimination preceding failed rejection attempts in a small cuckoo host
TLDR
This is the first demonstration of a cuckoo host discriminating against real parasitic eggs but often accepting them, and results show that in host species experiencing difficulties in performing puncture ejection, non-mimetic cuckoos eggs may avoid rejection by means of their unusually high structural strength.
University of Groningen Egg rejection in blackbirds Turdus merula
TLDR
The results considered together support the IBP hypothesis, indicating that recognition and rejection of parasitic eggs in blackbirds have probably evolved due to previous cuckoo parasitism, resulting in a successful resistance against interspecific brood parasitism.
Alternative mechanisms of increased eggshell hardness of avian brood parasites relative to host species
TLDR
Eggshell characteristics did not differ between parasite eggs sampled from different host nests in distant geographical sites, suggesting an evolutionarily shared microstructural mechanism of stronger parasite eggshells across diverse host-races of brood parasitic cuckoos.
Egg rejection in blackbirds Turdus merula: a by-product of conspecific parasitism or successful resistance against interspecific brood parasites?
TLDR
The results considered together support the IBP hypothesis, indicating that recognition and rejection of parasitic eggs in blackbirds have probably evolved due to previous cuckoo parasitism, resulting in a successful resistance against interspecific brood parasitism.
Selection of Cuculidae to the Hosts Based on the External Characteristics of the Eggs
TLDR
The studies represent an early stage in an attempt to strive the conservation of Cuculidae the bird hosts.
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TLDR
The results are consistent with the hypothesis that host motivation when confronted with mimetic eggs needs to increase above a certain threshold before rejection behavior is released, which likely minimizes the risk of recognition errors.
Rejection Behavior by Common Cuckoo Hosts Towards Artificial Brood Parasite Eggs
TLDR
The puncture resistance hypothesis proposed to explain the adaptive value (or evolution) of strength in cowbird eggs is supported and has received support from Picman and Rohwer et al.
Eggshell strength of an obligate brood parasite: a test of the puncture resistance hypothesis
TLDR
There was no evidence that egg damage was associated with cuckoo egg laying, and some support for the puncture resistance hypothesis for the occurrence of thick-shelled eggs in common cuckoos Cuculus canorus.
Is greater eggshell density an alternative mechanism by which parasitic cuckoos increase the strength of their eggs?
TLDR
Comparisons to two control groups demonstrated that the parasitic cuckoos have eggshells of significantly higher density than would be expected for their size, supporting the hypothesis that the higher eggshell density is an alternative mechanism by which some cuckoo increase the strength of their eggs.
EGG REJECTION IN MARSH WARBLERS (ACROCEPHALUS PALUSTRIS) HEAVILY PARASITIZED BY COMMON CUCKOOS (CUCULUS CANORUS)
TLDR
The Marsh Warbler's highly developed egg-recognition ability and the good mimicry of Common Cuckoo eggs suggests that this poorly known host-parasite arms race has reached an advanced stage.
On the evolution of blue Cuckoo eggs in Europe
TLDR
Cuckoo eggs in nests of both these species show a, statistically significant, better mimicry with host eggs than in the nests of either Pied Flycatcher or Wheatear, thus supporting the main prediction.
How to hatch from an egg of great structural strength. A study of the Common Cuckoo
TLDR
It is suggested that hatching is more difficult for a Cuckoo than for a Great Reed Warbler and that Cuckoos possess several mechanisms to overcome the problems of hatching from a structurally strong egg.
Rejection of artificial cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) eggs in relation to variation in egg appearance among reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)
TLDR
The results are consistent with the evolutionary arms race hypothesis, but the intermediate rejection rate found in this population of reed warblers could also be maintained by an equilibrium between acceptors and rejecters due to rejection costs.
AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CO-EVOLUTION BETWEEN THE CUCKOO, CUCULUS CANORUS, AND ITS HOSTS. I. HOST EGG DISCRIMINATION
TLDR
Three results suggest that the egg discrimination by suitable hosts has evolved in response to cuckoo parasitism, and Species unsuitable as hosts mainly showed little if any rejection of model eggs unlike their own.
Is egg-damaging behavior by great spotted cuckoos an accident or an adaptation?
TLDR
Experimental evidence that egg damage increased the breeding success of cuckoos when they laid late during the laying sequence of the magpie, and simulated laying behavior by the great spotted cuckoo support the predictions of the adaptation hypothesis, implying that eggDamage is not an incidental consequence of rapid egg laying, but an adaptation.
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