Does the contribution of stimulus-hand correspondence to the auditory Simon effect increase with practice?

@article{Proctor2010DoesTC,
  title={Does the contribution of stimulus-hand correspondence to the auditory Simon effect increase with practice?},
  author={Robert W. Proctor and Chunhong Shao},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={204},
  pages={131-137}
}
In two-choice reaction tasks for which stimulus location is irrelevant, crossing the hands typically does not alter the benefit for corresponding stimulus and response locations (the Simon effect), which implies location coding of responses. However, for auditory tasks in which a consistent mapping between responding hand and tone pitch is maintained, the Simon effect may become smaller for crossed than uncrossed hands with practice, suggesting increased reliance on anatomical coding. Two… CONTINUE READING

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