Does the Patient's Payer Matter in Hospital Patient Safety?: A Study of Urban Hospitals

@article{Clement2007DoesTP,
  title={Does the Patient's Payer Matter in Hospital Patient Safety?: A Study of Urban Hospitals},
  author={J. Clement and Richard C Lindrooth and Askar Chukmaitov and Hsueh-Fen Chen},
  journal={Medical Care},
  year={2007},
  volume={45},
  pages={131-138}
}
Background:Previous studies have documented that hospitals decrease costs in response to reimbursement cutbacks. However, research concerning how this may affect quality of care has produced mixed results. Until recently, the ability to study changes in patient safety and payment has been limited. Objective:The objective of the study was to determine whether changes in 4 hospital patient safety indicator (PSI) rates are related to changes in the generosity of payers over time. Data and Methods… Expand
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